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  1. Häuser
  2. Bedachungsmaterial: Dachziegel

Kleine Häuser mit Ziegeldach Ideen und Design

Hampstead houseHampstead house
Brosh ArchitectsBrosh Architects
The renovation and rear extension to a lower ground floor of a 4 storey Victorian Terraced house in Hampstead Conservation Area.
Kleines, Einstöckiges Modernes Reihenhaus mit Backsteinfassade, Satteldach, Ziegeldach und schwarzem Dach in Hertfordshire
Satteldachhaus modern interpretiertSatteldachhaus modern interpretiert
Mittelstädt-HausMittelstädt-Haus
Einstöckiges, Kleines Modernes Einfamilienhaus mit Backsteinfassade, Satteldach und Ziegeldach in Hamburg
A Contemporary Barn ConversionA Contemporary Barn Conversion
Croft ArchitectureCroft Architecture
In Brief Our client has occupied their mid-19th Century farm house in a small attractive village in Staffordshire for many years. As the family has grown and developed, their lifestyles and living patterns have changed. Although the existing property is particularly generous in terms of size and space, the family circumstances had changed, and they needed extra living space to accommodate older members of their family. The layout and shape of the farm house’s living accommodation didn’t provide the functional space for everyday modern family life. Their kitchen is located at the far end of the house, and, in fact it is furthest ground floor room away from the garden. This proves challenging for the family during the warmer, sunnier months when they wish to spend more time eating and drinking outdoors. The only access they have to the garden is from a gate at the rear of the property. The quickest way to get there is through the back door which leads onto their rear driveway. The family virtually need to scale the perimeter of the house to access their garden. The family would also like to comfortably welcome additional older family members to the household. Although their relatives want the security of being within the family hub they also want their own space, privacy and independence from the core of the family. We were appointed by our client to help them create a design solution that responds to the needs of the family, for now, and into the foreseeable future. In Context To the rear of the farmhouse our clients had still retained the red bricked historic bake house and granary barn. The family wanted to maximise the potential of the redundant building by converting it into a separate annex to accommodate their older relatives. They also sought a solution to accessing the back garden from the farmhouse. Our clients enjoy being in the garden and would like to be able to easily spend more time outside. The barn offers an ideal use of vacant space from which to create additional living accommodation that’s on the ground floor, independent, private, and yet it’s easy to access the hub of the family home. Our Approach The client’s home is in a small village in the Staffordshire countryside, within a conservation area. Their attractive mid-19th century red bricked farmhouse occupies a prominent corner position next to the church at the entrance to High Street. Its former farm buildings and yard have been sold for residential conversion and redevelopment but to the rear the farmhouse still retains its historic bake house with granary above. The barn is a two-storey red brick building with a clay tiled roof and the upper floor can still accessed by an external flight of stone steps. Over the years the bake house has only been used by the family for storage and needed some repairs. The barn's style is a great example which reflects the way that former farming activity was carried out back in the mid-19th Century. The new living space within the barn solves three problems in one. The empty barn provides the perfect space for developing extra en-suite, ground floor living accommodation for the family, creating additional flexible space on the first floor of the barn for the family’s hobbies. The conversion provides a to link the main farmhouse with barn, the garden and the drive way. It will also give a new lease of life back to the historic barn preserving and enhancing its originality. Design Approach Every element of the historical barns restoration was given careful consideration, to sensitively retain and restore the original character. The property has some significant features of heritage value all lending to its historical character. For example, to the rear of the barn there is an original beehive oven. Historical Gems A beehive oven is a type of oven that’s been used since the Middle Ages in Europe. It gets its name from its domed shape, which resembles that of an old-fashioned beehive. The oven is an extremely rare example and is a feature that our team and our clients wanted to restore and incorporate into the new design. The conservation officer was in favour of retaining the beehive oven to preserve it for future studies. Our clients also have a well in the front garden of the farmhouse. The old well is located exactly under the spot of the proposed new en-suite WC. We liaised with the conservation officer and they were happy for the well to be covered rather than preserved within the design. We discussed the possibility of making a feature of the well within the barn to our clients and made clear that highlighting the well would be costly in both time and money. The family had a budget and timescale to follow and they decided against incorporating the well within the new design. We ensured that the redundant well was properly assessed, before it could be infilled and capped with a reinforced concrete slab. Another aspect of the barn that we were all keen to preserve were the external granary steps and door. They are part of the building’s significance and character; their loss would weaken the character and heritage of the old granary barn. We ensured that the steps and door should be retained and repaired within the new design. It was imperative for clients and our team to retain the historical features that form the character and history of the building. The external stone steps and granary door complement the original design indicating the buildings former working purpose within the 19th Century farm complex. An experienced structural specialist was appointed to produce a structural report, to ensure all aspects of the building were sound prior to planning. Our team worked closely with the conservation officer to ensure that the project remained sensitive and sympathetic to the locality of the site and the existing buildings. Access Problems Solved Despite being in a Conservation Area, the conservation officer and the planners were happy with a seamless contemporary glazed link from the main farm to the granary barn. The new glazed link, not only brings a significant amount of light into the interior of the farmhouse, but also granary barn, creating an open and fluid area within the home, rather than it just being a corridor. The glazed hallway provides the family with direct access from the main farmhouse to the granary barn, and it opens outdirectly onto their garden space. The link to the barn changes the way that the family currently live for the better, creating flexibility in terms of direct access to the outside space and to the granary barn. Working Together We worked closely with the conservation officer to ensure that our initial design for the planned scheme was befitting of its place in the Conservation Area (and suited to a historic structure). It was our intention to create a modern and refreshing space which complements the original building. A close collaboration between the client, the conservation officer, the planners and our team has enabled us the deliver a design that retains as much of the working aesthetic of the buildings as possible. Local planners were keen to see the building converted to residential use to save it from disrepair, allowing the chance to create a unique home with significant original features, such as the beehive oven, the stone steps and the granary doors. We have sensitively and respectfully designed the barn incorporating new architecture with a sense of the old history from the existing buildings. This allows the current work to be interpreted as an additional thread to the historical context of the buildings, without affecting their character. The former barn has been sympathetically transformed inside and out, corresponding well with the historical significance of the immediate farm site and the local area. We’ve created a new sleek, contemporary glazed link for the family to the outside of their house, whilst developing additional living space that retains the historical core, ethos and detail of the building. In addition, the clients can also now take advantage of the unrivaled views of the church opposite, from the upper floor of the historic barn. Feeling inspired? Find out how we converted a Grade II LIsted Farmhouse.
Dining Room Extension and LandscapeDining Room Extension and Landscape
Your Home PlansYour Home Plans
Kleine, Dreistöckige Klassische Doppelhaushälfte mit Backsteinfassade, Satteldach, Ziegeldach und grauem Dach in Sussex
011 Entre Limoneros011 Entre Limoneros
Veracruz ArquitecturaVeracruz Arquitectura
Kleines, Einstöckiges Rustikales Einfamilienhaus mit Putzfassade, gelber Fassadenfarbe, Mansardendach, Ziegeldach, braunem Dach und Schindeln in Sonstige
良日庵良日庵
アトリエスクエア1級建築士事務所アトリエスクエア1級建築士事務所
郊外の山間部にある和風の住宅
Kleines, Einstöckiges Asiatisches Einfamilienhaus mit Putzfassade, beiger Fassadenfarbe, Walmdach und Ziegeldach in Fukuoka
Венецианская Вилла ОСКАР на РублёвкеВенецианская Вилла ОСКАР на Рублёвке
Александр ГликманАлександр Гликман
Вилла OSCAR в венецианском стиле, в деревне Солослово
Kleines, Zweistöckiges Klassisches Einfamilienhaus mit Putzfassade, roter Fassadenfarbe und Ziegeldach in Moskau
Contemporary SemiContemporary Semi
Cordony GroupCordony Group
Kleines, Einstöckiges Klassisches Einfamilienhaus mit Backsteinfassade, Ziegeldach, brauner Fassadenfarbe und Walmdach in Sydney
Motorcoach CC Lot 203Motorcoach CC Lot 203
Desert Isles Inc.Desert Isles Inc.
Kleines, Einstöckiges Modernes Haus mit Steinfassade, beiger Fassadenfarbe, Walmdach und Ziegeldach in Sonstige
Proyecto Casa de Pueblo Costa BravaProyecto Casa de Pueblo Costa Brava
Nice Home BarcelonaNice Home Barcelona
Kleines, Zweistöckiges Mediterranes Haus mit Putzfassade, weißer Fassadenfarbe, Pultdach und Ziegeldach in Barcelona
Ferienhaus BjörköFerienhaus Björkö
SKAN-HUS Projekt GmbHSKAN-HUS Projekt GmbH
Ferienhaus geht auch ökologisch und nachhaltig.
Kleines, Einstöckiges Nordisches Haus mit roter Fassadenfarbe, Satteldach und Ziegeldach in Frankfurt am Main
Andersen Black 100 Series Contemporary Windows- Cedar Hill TXAndersen Black 100 Series Contemporary Windows- Cedar Hill TX
Brennan EnterprisesBrennan Enterprises
Milgard aluminum windows in black. This product is no longer available from Brennan. Please check our website for alternatives | https://brennancorp.com/
Mike and Peggy's HouseMike and Peggy's House
David Watkins Home Design, LLCDavid Watkins Home Design, LLC
This Elevation projects a degree of privacy as the front door is not visible directly in the front of the house. The Front Porch and Entry are on the side of the house. The pergola on the right leads to the front door.
Vestry RoadVestry Road
Oliver Leech ArchitectsOliver Leech Architects
Rear and side extension to a terraced house in Camberwell.
Kleines, Zweistöckiges Klassisches Reihenhaus mit brauner Fassadenfarbe, Satteldach und Ziegeldach in London
Terraced house ground floor internal redesign and extensionTerraced house ground floor internal redesign and extension
White and Gray Architecture Design DevelopWhite and Gray Architecture Design Develop
Modern injection to a traditional facade, full height glazed bi-fold door bringing the outside in.
Kleines, Einstöckiges Klassisches Reihenhaus mit Backsteinfassade, Pultdach und Ziegeldach in London
Long DittonLong Ditton
id8 designs ltdid8 designs ltd
Kleines, Einstöckiges Modernes Reihenhaus mit Backsteinfassade, brauner Fassadenfarbe, Satteldach und Ziegeldach in Surrey
Exquisitely Renovated SemiExquisitely Renovated Semi
Cordony GroupCordony Group
Kleines, Einstöckiges Modernes Reihenhaus mit Satteldach, Backsteinfassade, Ziegeldach und weißer Fassadenfarbe in Sydney
Haus im IsartalHaus im Isartal
Unterlandstättner ArchitektenUnterlandstättner Architekten
Kleines, Einstöckiges Modernes Einfamilienhaus mit Mix-Fassade, weißer Fassadenfarbe und Ziegeldach in München
Oak Framed Kitchen ExtensionOak Framed Kitchen Extension
Croft ArchitectureCroft Architecture
Our clients have always loved the location of their house for easy access to work, schools, leisure facilities and social connections, but they were becoming increasingly frustrated with the form and size constraints of their home. As the family has grown and developed their lifestyles and living patterns had changed. Their three bedroomed link detached house was starting to feel small and it was proving to be increasingly unsuitable for their lifestyle. The separate downstairs living areas were dividing the family, they were struggling to fit in a room big enough to accommodate them all to sit down and eat together. As a result of the small separate living, kitchen and dining spaces they were spending little time in each other’s company. They desired to create a long term solution for their young family to grow into and enjoy. Rather than moving house or self-building from scratch, they decided to stay in the location that they loved and to add a modern extension to their existing home. They aspired to create a modern, functional space for everyday family life, whilst improving the curb appeal of their home to add value. We were appointed by our clients to create a design solution to replace the old, cold, and leaking conservatory to the rear of the property, with a modern, light filled, open plan home extension. The intention for the new large open living space was to break down the room barriers and respond to the needs of the family to support their home life into the foreseeable future. Delivering on time and within budget were essential. With a young family and pets at home it was essential for minimal disruption to their daily lifestyle. The family needed help from our team at Croft Architecture to swiftly and successfully acquire Planning and Building Control Approval for their project to progress rapidly, ensuring project completion on time and to their determined budget. In Context A families, needs, wants, and desires are constantly changing as they mature, yet our family nests stay static, and can obstruct the ease and enjoyment of everyday life if they don’t adapt in line with modern living requirements. Our Approach The client’s home is located in a suburb of the city of Stoke-on-Trent in North Staffordshire. Their original house is a three bedroomed link detached family home that’s located on a mature housing estate close to the Trent and Mersey Canal. The original home is immediately connected to the properties on either side via the garage link, with a neighbouring property flanking wall also located at the base of their rear garden too. Before progressing with the project we advised the family to inform all of their adjoining neighbours of their intention to extend. It's often much better to take the neighbourly approach and to inform neighbours of works in advace, so that they can express any concerns,which are often easily resolved. Other matters to discuss with neighbours may be the need to have a Party Wall agreement. For more details about Party Wall Regulations click here to take a look at our blog. To create the space that our clients aspired to achieve the neighbouring properties needed to be taken into consideration. Design Approach The site available was compact so a balance needed to e struck to provide a generous amount of floor space for the new extension. Our clients needed our help to create a design solution that offered them a generous amount of extra space whilst bearing no visual impact on the neighbouring properties or street scene. The development of the design for the home extension referenced the style and character of the homes in the immediate neighbourhood, with particular features being given a contemporary twist. Our clients had done their own research and planning with regards to the required look, finish and materials that wanted to use. They liked oak beamed structures and they wanted to create a light space that seamlessly opened into the garden, using a glazed oak beamed structure. However, oak comes a price and our clients had a determined budget for the project. Numerous companies were contacted for prices to reflect their budget and eventually perseverance paid off. The oak structure was sourced locally in Staffordshire. The design of the newly extended family space complements the style & character of the main house, emulating design features and style of brick work. Careful design consideration has been given to ensure that the newly extended family living space corresponds well with not only, the adjoining properties, but also the neighbouring homes within the local area. It was essential to ensure that the style, scale and proportions of the new generous family living space to the rear of the property beard no visual impact on the streetscape, yet the design responded to the living patterns of the family. The extension to the rear of the home replaces a conservatory spanning the full width of the property, which was always too cold to use in the winter and too hot in the summer. We saw the opportunity for our clients to take advantage of the westerly afternoon/evening sun and to fill the space with natural light. We combined the traditional oak framing with modern glazing methods incorporated into the oak structure. The design of the extension was developed to receive the sunlight throughout the day using roof lights, with the evening sun being captured by the floor to ceiling grey framed bi-folding doors. The pitched roof extension creates an internal vaulted ceiling giving the impression of a light, airy space, especially with the addition of the large roof lights. The updated light grey, high gloss kitchen and light grey marble countertops help reflect the light from the skylights in the ceiling, with a zesty lime grey block splashback creating a perfect accent colour to reflect the family’s fun personalities and to bring life to their new living space. The extension is an open room with the kitchen and dining room all sharing the same space. White walls have been combined with wooden flooring and oak structure to create a sense of warmth. The oak beams really come into their own in this large open plan space, especially with the vaulted ceiling and large folding doors open seamlessly into the back garden. Adding an oak framed extension with the floor to ceiling glazing has enabled the family to get the ‘wow factor’ within their budget. Externally, our team at Croft Architecture have created a clean, traditional addition to the existing period property, whilst inside the dwelling now has a new, sleek, light and spacious family ‘hub’ that seamlessly connects with the existing home and the garden. Our team has also worked closely with the client to consider the project as whole and not just the home extension and new additional garden space. The design of the external space has been carefully remodelled to ensure that the ground not only, works for the family, but also successfully enhance the visual appearance. A strong working relationship between our team, the client and the planners enabled us to gain the necessary permissions promptly, rapidly propelling the project forwards within a short time frame. We enjoyed working with the project team and we’re extremely pleased to successfully deliver the completed project in accordance with our client’s timescales and budget.
Encinitas ADUEncinitas ADU
J Build IncJ Build Inc
This is a ADU ( Accessory Dwelling Unit) that we did in Encinitas, Ca. This is a 2 story 399 sq. ft. build. This unit has a full kitchen, laundry, bedroom, bathroom, living area, spiral stair case, and outdoor shower. It was a fun build!!

Kleine Häuser mit Ziegeldach Ideen und Design

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Deutschland
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